Published:  12:00 AM, 10 January 2017

US troops to stay in Afghanistan

US troops to stay in Afghanistan
A US Army AH-64 Apache helicopter from the 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade takes off from Forward Operating Base Dahlke, Afghanistan, May 18, 2016. The 40th CAB sent soldiers, aircraft and equipment to the base in May to support the garrison's mission to train, advice and assist the Afghan National Army. US Apache helicopters have entered the fight in Iraq against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Defense Secretary Ash Carter told reporters June 13. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Ian M. Kummer

A US Army AH-64 Apache helicopter from the 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade takes off from Forward Operating Base Dahlke, Afghanistan, May 18, 2016. The 40th CAB sent soldiers, aircraft and equipment to the base in May to support the garrison's mission to train, advice and assist the Afghan National Army. US Apache helicopters have entered the fight in Iraq against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Defense Secretary Ash Carter told reporters June 13. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Ian M. Kummer

I started writing about geopolitics in South Asia and MENA about five years back. The objective was to share my views with global readers, particularly the Think Tanks operating in the US. Most of the topics I picked up over the years were 1) proxy wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, 2) imposition of economic sanctions on Iran for decades, 3) use of crude oil as weapon, 4) melodramas in the name of change of regime, 5) creations of phantoms like Taliban, Al Qaeda and ISIS and 6) dishonest western media.

The title of my second blog article written 2012 was, Will US pull its troops out of Afghanistan in 2014 Despite having little knowledge about international relations or geopolitics at that time, my conclusion was that the US will never pull its troops out of Afghanistan. My conclusion was based on the fact that presence of the US troops in Afghanistan provides it a safe haven for undertaking cross border actions in Pakistan, Iran, China and some of the energy rich Central Asian countries.

I had deliberately avoided mentioning drugs as one of the prime reasons for the US troops for occupying Afghanistan, but one of the readers was prompt in raising this point. If one thinks with a cool head this may be a key reason because it gives control over the drug trade and also the money to be paid to militants for killing the innocents ruthlessly and to keep the world permanently under fear. It may also be said that Afghanistan has become a nursery for growing mercenaries and people from around the world to get training in the rugged mountains of Afghanistan. They are also paid from the money earned from cultivation of poppies.

Having been born and grown up in war-ridden Afghanistan, the locals have become 'blood thirsty' and suffer from restlessness. Ironically, they not only kill their own countrymen, but also go to places where conflicts have been created by the super powers to satisfy their lust. After fighting two world wars, the super power have decided to fight proxy wars, sell arms to the governments where rebel groups have been created by them, and use the income from drugs and oil for buying arms. The job becomes easier through the propagation of regime change mantra.

These super powers are among the sponsors of the UN, created for restoring peace in the world. However, now the only role of Security Council is to grant permission for attacking a country chosen for the proxy war. Two of the worst examples are Afghanistan and Iraq. All too often, military dictators are made heads of state and often the drama of sham democracy is staged.

The writer is an economic analyst

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