Published:  12:00 AM, 14 February 2017

Take pride in being a woman

Take pride in being a woman

It has been said that women are the four pillars that hold a house together; that they were created to be of support to the male race, but let us all pause and think for a moment if in reality women have been put in such a high position?  Are women respected for what they do for society? Or are they all seen as maids that have exclusive rights to share the master's bedroom? Yes, women have been reduced to a position that receiving abuse and torment is part of everyday life. But as of late, women's rights activism has brought about a change in the way women think and feel about themselves. The Sunday leader spoke to one such activist, Dr. Sepali Kottegoda.

Dr. Kottegoda is the Executive Director of Women And Media Collective (WMC) and she was also involved in the formation of the organization. When asked her about how she got interested in Women's' rights activism she replied that from a young age she noticed that girls and boys were treated differently.  " For instance,  if I were to climb a tree every single passer-by would say what a tom boy or her parents haven't brought her up properly. However, if a boy were to climb a tree it would be viewed as something normal and "okay"

She went on to describe her choices in education. " When I started university I chose English Literature as my main subject for my post-graduate stream but somewhere along the way I felt as though this was not for me. I wanted to do something greater so I changed my subjects and did my first degree in English Literature, my second degree Masters, and Doctorate in Developmental Studies." After completing her Masters she felt drawn to women's' rights activism so with the help of a group of feminist friends she saw the birth of WMC. With feminism in mind, these women took the initiative in developing women professionally and otherwise.

It has been said that women are the four pillars that hold a house together; that they were created to be of support to the male race, but let us all pause and think for a moment if in reality women have been put in such a high position?  Are women respected for what they do for society? Or are they all seen as maids that have exclusive rights to share the master's bedroom? Yes, women have been reduced to a position that receiving abuse and torment is part of everyday life. But as of late, women's' rights activism has brought about a change in the way women think and feel about themselves. The Sunday leader spoke to one such activist, Dr. Sepali Kottegoda.

Dr. Kottegoda is the Executive Director of Women And Media Collective (WMC) and she was also involved in the formation of the organization. When asked her about how she got interested in Womens' rights activism she replied that from a young age she noticed that girls and boys were treated differently.  " For instance,  if I were to climb a tree every single passer-by would say what a tom boy or her parents haven't brought her up properly. However, if a boy were to climb a tree it would be viewed as something normal and "okay"

She went on to describe her choices in education. " When I started university I chose English Literature as my main subject for my post-graduate stream but somewhere along the way I felt as though this was not for me. I wanted to do something greater so I changed my subjects and did my first degree in English Literature, my second degree Masters, and Doctorate in Developmental Studies." After completing her Masters she felt drawn to womens' rights activism so with the help of a group of feminist friends she saw the birth of WMC. With feminism in mind, these women took the initiative in developing women professionally and otherwise.

The writer is a journalist at Sunday Leader.

Leave Your Comments



Latest News


More From Reciprocal

Go to Home Page »

Site Index The Asian Age