Published:  12:31 AM, 22 November 2020

For clean politics


While addressing a rally not very long ago, the ruling Awami League General Secretary noted that politicians had a hand in the rise of corruption now holding the country in its vicious grip. We are glad that Obaidul Quader stated the facts as they happen to be. His contention that a large number of, if not all, politicians have their reputations tarnished with corruption is something which is shared by citizens. It is shared because of the sordid manner in which many politicians, linked to the ruling party, have indulged in behaviour that is the very antithesis of what Bangabandhu's party has always stood for.

It is not enough, however, to state facts in a frank manner. One needs to know what action the government has taken or means to take to stem the rot. We have observed in the recent past that when news appeared of pro-government activists resorting to violence, the follow-up action was less than we expected. All that happened was that the organization expelled these elements. That was a good move, but it did not go far enough because such expulsion was not followed by legal action by the police, who should have filed criminal charges against such elements. The result was disappointing: such disreputable elements continued to walk free.

Citizens now hope that when powerful people in the government speak of corruption, proper action will follow. One cannot rest satisfied with the corrupt being chastised over their wrong dealings. In a country where rules regarding an investigation of corruption certainly exist, it is natural to expect wrongdoers to be brought before the law. Ruling party politicians surely know who in their party are corrupt. They should go after them and at the same time ensure that the law will also be applied against these elements. The ruling circles owe it to the nation to ensure that they mean to clean up the mess that has been piling up. 


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