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North Korea test-fires most powerful missile since 2017 -The Asian Age




North Korea on Sunday tested its most

powerful missile since 2017, ramping up the firepower for its record-breaking

seventh launch this month as Seoul warned nuclear and long-range tests could

be next.

  Pyongyang has never test-fired this many missiles in a calendar month

before and last week threatened to abandon a nearly five-year-long self-

imposed moratorium on testing long-range and nuclear weapons.

  With peace talks with the US stalled, North Korea has doubled-down on

leader Kim Jong Un's vow to modernise the regime's armed forces, flexing

Pyongyang's military muscles despite biting international sanctions.

  South Korea said Sunday that North Korea appeared to be following a

"similar pattern" to 2017 -- when tensions were last at breaking-point on the

peninsula -- warning Pyongyang could soon restart nuclear and

intercontinental missile tests.

  North Korea "has come close to destroying the moratorium declaration",

South Korea's President Moon Jae-in said in a statement following an

emergency meeting of Seoul's National Security Council.

  South Korea's military said Sunday North Korea test-fires most powerful missile since 2017


North Korea on Sunday tested its most

powerful missile since 2017, ramping up the firepower for its record-breaking

seventh launch this month as Seoul warned nuclear and long-range tests could

be next.

  Pyongyang has never test-fired this many missiles in a calendar month

before and last week threatened to abandon a nearly five-year-long self-

imposed moratorium on testing long-range and nuclear weapons.

  With peace talks with the US stalled, North Korea has doubled-down on

leader Kim Jong Un's vow to modernise the regime's armed forces, flexing

Pyongyang's military muscles despite biting international sanctions.

  South Korea said Sunday that North Korea appeared to be following a

"similar pattern" to 2017 -- when tensions were last at breaking-point on the

peninsula -- warning Pyongyang could soon restart nuclear and

intercontinental missile tests.

  North Korea "has come close to destroying the moratorium declaration",

South Korea's President Moon Jae-in said in a statement following an

emergency meeting of Seoul's National Security Council.

  South Korea's military said Sunday it had "detected an intermediate-range

ballistic missile fired at a lofted angle eastward towards the East Sea."

  A lofted trajectory involves missiles being fired at a high angle instead

of out to their full range.

  Sunday's ballistic missile was estimated to have hit a maximum altitude of

2,000 kilometers and flown around 800 kilometers for half an hour, Seoul's

Joint Chiefs of Staff said.

  That indicated that Pyongyang may have tested its "first Intermediate-Range

Ballistic Missile (IRBM) since 2017", Joseph Dempsey, an analyst with the

International Institute for Strategic Studies, wrote on Twitter.

  The last time Pyongyang tested a similar missile was in 2017, when the

Hwasong-12 flew 787 kilometers at an apogee of just over 2,111 kilometers.

  Analysts said at the time that the trajectory indicated that the missile

could have flown around 4,500 km if fired on a range-maximizing ballistic

trajectory -- putting the US territory of Guam in range.

  Japan's top government spokesman Hirokazu Matsuno said Sunday that the

ballistic missile "was one with intermediate-range or longer range."

it had "detected an intermediate-range

ballistic missile fired at a lofted angle eastward towards the East Sea."

  A lofted trajectory involves missiles being fired at a high angle instead

of out to their full range.

  Sunday's ballistic missile was estimated to have hit a maximum altitude of

2,000 kilometers and flown around 800 kilometers for half an hour, Seoul's

Joint Chiefs of Staff said.

  That indicated that Pyongyang may have tested its "first Intermediate-Range

Ballistic Missile (IRBM) since 2017", Joseph Dempsey, an analyst with the

International Institute for Strategic Studies, wrote on Twitter.

  The last time Pyongyang tested a similar missile was in 2017, when the

Hwasong-12 flew 787 kilometers at an apogee of just over 2,111 kilometers.

  Analysts said at the time that the trajectory indicated that the missile

could have flown around 4,500 km if fired on a range-maximizing ballistic

trajectory -- putting the US territory of Guam in range.

  Japan's top government spokesman Hirokazu Matsuno said Sunday that the

ballistic missile "was one with intermediate-range or longer range."